Julian Parker Explains Why We Use Magnecor

 

Magnecor are a leading manufacturer of high performance ignition leadsets. Made in the UK from high specification conductors, each set is specially designed to fit with ease onto your classic car distributor, and caters for both push fit caps and side entry caps.
When using a push fit cap, the Magnecor leads simply push down on top, and you’ll also notice that each lead is conveniently marked so that you can connect it without confusion. For side entry caps, the grub screw inside will fit with the Magnecor cable, and it’s important to select a Magnecor cable that has been specifically designed for this purpose.

Some of the fantastic Magnecor products we have on offer include:

Austin Healey 100/6 2.6 with Side Entry Distributor

This stainless steel conductor provides radio frequency interference suppression and a capacitive reserve to help ignition coil regeneration at high engine revolutions. It is surrounded by an EPDM insulator with fibreglass reinforcement, and covered with high temperature resistant silicone rubber. This set is for the Austin Healey 100/6 2.6 litre with carburettors and side entry distributor cap.

Triumph TR4 (Screw In Type)

This set is for the Triumph TR4 with screw in type distributor cap. It features radio frequency interface suppression, and is surrounded by an EPDM insulator with fibreglass reinforcement. As you would expect from any high quality product of this type, it also features high temperature resistant rubber.
Watch our video to hear more from Julian Parker, Managing Director, about finding the right Magnecor leadset for your classic motor. Then head over to our dedicated Magnecor product page and select the right leadset for you.

Is Your Classic Car Ready For Summer?

With the May bank holiday behind us, it’s safe to say that summer is well and truly on its way. But is your classic motor ready to hit the road again? Many owners tuck their classic cars away in the winter, anxiously anticipating the arrival of warmer weather. But that means you need to be extra vigilant in ensuring your motor is in optimal condition before taking it for a top-down spin around the countryside.

Here’s some basic checks you can complete before you embark on your next driving adventure:

 
Tyres and Brakes

 
It’s critical to make sure your tyres are in tip-top condition, so check the pressure first and that the tread is still legal. Then, hunt for any cracks in the tyre walls, along with any stones or nails that have potentially burrowed their way in during the winter and tighten the wheel nuts. As for the brakes, make sure the pads have plenty of life left in them and that the fluid levels are correct. If the brake pedals feel spongey when you push down on them, you may need to bleed the breaking system to remove any air and replace the brake fluid.

 
Oil

 
Check your oil level. If it’s low, you’ll need to top it up before you get going. Castrol classic oil is a superior product specifically designed for vintage and classic cars because it remains the right consistency at hotter temperatures and features less detergent than modern oils. To learn more about why Castrol oil is the best oil product for your classic car, click here.

 
Cooling System

 
It is vital to have an efficient cooling system in an older vehicle to prevent overheating. Check all parts within the system, including the hose, seals and radiator for leaks as well as the fan belt. You should also watch out for any perishing in rubber pipes. Should you need replacement radiator hoses, joiners or valves, you can find these on our dedicated page. Don’t forget to top up the coolant!

 
Lights, Wipers and Battery

 
Starting at the front of the car, test your main beam, side lights, fog lights, indicators and dipped beam. It usually helps to have a second person present to do this. Then move to the back and check the brake lights, reversing light and fog lights. Should any of these be faulty, use our Speedy Delivery Service to order yourself some bulbs. Ensure your wipers are in good condition with no ‘scudding’ on the screen. Should your wipers seem a tad worn out or damaged, order some more from our dedicated wiper page. As for the battery, you may have left this to trickle charge over the winter, in which case simply make sure you have enough charge to get going.

 
Clean and wax

 
You want your classic motor to look spick and span for the road, right? During the winter your motor will have likely acquired some grime and muck from the atmosphere. In which case, give it a wash with some good quality shampoo conditioner, wipe down the windows, clean out the wheels, and finish up with a touch of wax for that extra shine.

 
We know you can’t wait to get out and about in your classic vehicle again. But safety is paramount, so these simple checks are essentially before you get behind the wheel after an extended break.

An Interview With… James Ball, Classic Automotive Journalist

This week, we were thrilled to interview James Ball, a freelance classic automotive journalist and Deputy Editor of MOG Magazine. James has also written for Performance Ford and Octane Magazine as well as contributing photographs of classic motoring events far and wide.

 
What first got you into classic cars?

 
My dad has always loved cars and my grandad was into motorbikes. For many of my birthdays I often spent them at Donington Circuit. For the most part we went to the classic and historic events, and my interest in all things retro stems from there.

 
You’re an automotive journalist. Where does your job take you?

 
I have been working for MOG magazine, the official Morgan mag, for nearly four years and contributed the odd freelance piece to other motoring mags such as Octane. I’ve been lucky enough to drive a show car (80th Anniversary 4/4) straight off the stand at Geneva and back to the Morgan factory in Malvern. I’ve also driven through the pyrenees and had a close shave in a 3 Wheeler – a TT racer ditched a car on the Isle of Man mountain course. Thanks to the mag, I’ve driven thousands of miles in Morgans both old and vintage. My first Morgan drive was in a 1935 model, with its accelerator on the steering wheel!

 
What’s your favourite Motoring event? Have you attended any recently?

 
I have to say, your very own Bromyard Speed Festival is one of the best. It has all the cars you see at the likes of Goodwood, but less fussy stuff. The cars take centre stage. I quite like the Chateau Impney hillclimb too. Anything with a whiff of Castrol R in the air and I’m there.

 
What car or motorcycle do you aspire to own in the future?

 
I’m a big fan of Royal Enfield motorcycles. They’re affordable modern classics that are true to 50s design. As I have limited space at home, a motorcycle makes sense for me right now, however, I do see myself one day owning a Morgan car and am really thrilled Holden-Morgan are opening a Morgan show room at the Holden premises in Bromyard. Holden have a great reputation as a parts dealer and I’ll certainly be visiting soon.

 
Do you have a story to share? Perhaps a passion project or ongoing restoration? Get in touch via Facebook or email to be featured in our blog.

 

Product Of The Week – 2 Tonne Light Duty Car Jack

One of the most important pieces of equipment you can own for servicing your classic motor is a car jack. A car jack is critical for maintenance and repair and is therefore a staple tool for anyone who’s serious about keeping their classic car in tip top condition, or undertaking a restoration project.
So what do they do? Well, car jacks are used to lift the car high enough to access the essential components during a repair procedure. You might use it to complete an oil change, or to replace brake pads, tires and rotors. As well as raising the car itself, jacks can also elevate the motor. This is to provide additional clearance within the engine bay, for example, during an engine mount replacement procedure.
When working with a jack, safety is advised. The use of axel stands will prevent avoidable accidents and damage. It is also important to think about the maximum weight load you’re looking to support and match these between the jack and the axel.
Our product of the week is a trolley 2 ton light duty jack.
A trolley jack is a type of floor jack. It consists of a trolley with four wheels that contains a hydraulic cylinder which is responsible for raising and lowering a lever arm. This lever arm has a small platform that interacts with your car or truck. The advantages of working with a trolley jack over alternative designs is that they are extremely easy to use as they do not need you to put in much physical effort to lift a vehicle. The rear swivelling castors help to keep the jack properly positioned underneath the car which conveniently minimises the risk of jack lean and makes for an all around safer repair session.
The trolley 2 ton light duty jack features a 2 tonnes capacity and a lifting range of 130 to 350mm. Its overall size is 492 x 218 x 132mm.
So, if you’re interested in purchasing a jack or looking for similar models in our range, head over to our dedicated page now and place your order.

Why You Should Choose A Brantz Tripmeter

IMG_1900If you’re looking to kit out your classic rally car with a tripmeter in order to take competition to the next level, you can’t go wrong with Brantz.
The Brantz brand offers rallying equipment to anyone with an interest in classic rally cars – from enthusiastic novices to well oiled professionals. So no matter how many miles you’ve clocked up, there’s sure to be a product suitable for you.

Back in the sixties, serious rallying competitors utilised mechanical tripmeters to refine their navigation and gain a better speed record. Some rally regulations continue to allow only mechanical tripmeters and don’t permit tripmeters that display GPS or speed averages, however, many historic or retrospective rallies around the globe have recently approved the Brantz RetroTrip tripmeters, giving you more in the way of choice.

Retrotrip tripmeters feature electro-mechanical clicking digits and are calibrated to the car by operating switches on the unit. They are ordinarily used with an electrical sensor on the speedometer cable. Alternatively, you can use a wheel or propshaft sensor. The propshaft sensor consists of two magnets that are fitted to either side of the propshaft and can be easier to install than a dedicated wheel sensor due to the fact the design can accommodate larger clearances between rotating components.

Older cars with 6 volt electrics or doubtful 12 volt charging systems should also consider using the power conditioner. A power conditioner is designed to provide a stable voltage source so that it can function properly.

If you’re more interested in modern rallies, it’s recommended you use one of the Brantz International electronic tripmeters which rely on an electrical signal which is then processed electronically.

There are two main international tripmeters offered by Brantz.

For those of you who are road rallying or rallying at club level stage events, we recommend the Brantz International 1. This is a basic single readout tripmeter featuring a single red LED display and push wheel switches on the front.

For professional rally drivers we recommend the Brantz International 2. This offers all the same features as the international 1 tripmeter, but additionally has a second display showing intermediate distance as well as a remote reset button and a STEP knob on the front allowing adjustment to the Total distance.

If you’d like to measure average speed as well, The Brantz 2 ‘S’ Pro has all the features of International 1 and 2 but also the addition of a highly accurate speedometer which displays selectable or average speed. Bear in mind that rally regulations tend to not permit the use of average speed tracking via a tripmeter.

Now, for those of you that own multiple rally motors and wish to uninstall and reinstall the same tripmeter into more than one car, this process doesn’t need to be difficult. You can choose to use the plug and socket kit which is installed with the tripmeter allowing for straight forward removal once you’re finished.

Why not head over to our dedicated Brantz page and browse the latest products?